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Bob Hawsey named volunteer of the year by Thrivent Financial

Written by Staff Editor on .

Bob Hawsey, a Financial Representative with Thrivent Financial recently received the Rocky Mountain region award for volunteer of the year. The award is given to a financial representative from the region that has been recognized for outstanding service to his or her members and community, while also maintaining and growing an outstanding business practice.

Hawsey volunteers at various organizaUons around the Evergreen area including: Evergreen Lutheran Church, the Blue Spruce Habitat for Humanity ReStore in Conifer, and Evergreen Christian Outreach among others.

He also encourages his members to get involved and make a difference through Thrivent Action Teams. This program activates and encourages members to bring a volunteer team together to make an immediate impact for a cause they care about through a fundraising activity, service project, or educational program.

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June, July sessions planned for Camp Comfort

Written by Stephen Knapp on .

Sandy-haired and tentative, 11-year-old Barry didn’t know quite what to make of Camp Comfort’s zip-line.

“Is it safe?” he asked, really wanting to know. Barry had come to Mount Evans’ award-winning bereavement camp near Empire following the death of his mother, and he wasn’t interested in risks and uncertainties. Although you’d never guess it from talking with him – at least not right away – what Barry wanted most was to tell somebody about his mom, about how much he missed her, and about how scared and sad he felt all the time.

“Is it safe?” he asked, really wanting to know. Barry had come to Mount Evans’ award-winning bereavement camp near Empire following the death of his mother, and he wasn’t interested in risks and uncertainties. Although you’d never guess it from talking with him – at least not right away – what Barry wanted most was to tell somebody about his mom, about how much he missed her, and about how scared and sad he felt all the time.

“When a parent’s spouse dies, they’re often overwhelmed by their own grief and all the other trouble that comes after a death,” says Wendy Snow, a licensed Mount Evans social worker and devoted to Camp Comfort’s mission. “The child’s grief gets forgotten. It’s nobody’s fault, it’s just what happens.”

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Meet Denise Stoner

Written by Linda Kirkpatrick on .

Not many people have seen a Great Horned Owl up close and personal, but Denise Stoner has. She’s even comforted one that lost its mate.

Several years ago Denise walked out the back door to find a large, bulky mass of gold and brown feathers lying lifeless in her yard. It was unlike anything she’d ever seen before, and it did not show any signs of having been killed by another animal.

The big-bodied, feathered mass – about 20 inches long and weighing about 3 pounds – was actually a female Great Horned Owl that had died of unknown causes. For several nights afterward its mate would perch atop a nearby church and screech in agony over its lost mate. These birds are monogamous; and it would appear that they, too, mourn over the loss of a mate.

With the same tender care as Denise gives her patients and beloved god-dogs, she tended to a respectful handling of the remains, even to the extent of including those with Native American beliefs in the process.